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"Dedicated to the preservation of Standard Cars 1903-1963"

Dedicated to the preservation of Standard Cars 1903-1963

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1914 Model S Rhyl


1914 Standard Model S with "Rhyl" coachwork




Standard's first light car was the Model S, launched in 1913. Prior to that date, the Standard Motor Company had concentrated on building large and expensive six cylinder cars. The new car came in various body styles, the cheapest and most popular being the two-seater "Rhyl". Prices started at £195, rising to £210 for an all-weather version with two piece windscreen, sidescreens and a higher quality hood. There was also more luxurious versions, a Hurlingham Victoria at £250 and the Ranelagh and Richmond models at £275. Acetylene lights, as on this example, were standard, electric lighting being a £20 option. The car was a roaring success and up to 50 a week were coming out of the factory gates.

This superbly preserved example dates from 1914, just before the factory went over to manufacture of aircraft for the first world war. It's owned by Grahame Dutch from Tunbridge Wells in Kent. Grahame uses the car on a regular basis both at home and on the continent, a testament to the reliability and ability of these little cars

 




Nearside view of the engine compartment



Simplicity itself, hand throttle on the left and advance retard control on the right hand of the steering column


No speedometer, and the petrol filler in the middle of the dashboard


The "boot" has enough room for some tools and a small suitcase




Specification of the 1914 Model S

RAC Rating 9.5Hp

4 Cylinders, 62mm x 90mm, 1087 sidevalve

Wheelbase: 7' 6"", Track: 4' 0", Length: 10' 6"

I am aware that there are other cars and information that could be added to this site to make it more comprehensive, so if you have material and photographs, please let me know.  Please send me, Phil Homer, a message at: Phil Homer